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  • Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections are bacterial infections that are minimally or no longer responsive to commonly used antibiotics. In other words, these bacteria are resistant to antibiotics - they cannot be killed and their growth cannot be stopped. An infection that does not respond appropriately to an antibiotic is suggestive of an antibiotic resistant bacterial infection.

  • Antibody titers are sometimes needed to diagnose disease. Antibody titers reflect the level of antibody that the pet has made in response to exposure to a certain infectious organism. The titer is generated by sequentially diluting the serum and testing it against the organism in question. The more dilute the serum when it stops producing a positive reaction, the higher the concentration of antibodies present in the blood. Titers give support to a diagnosis allowing more targeted treatment and more specific prognostic information as well as identifying zoonotic disease.

  • Antioxidants are given by mouth and are over the counter supplements used to treat side effects from inflammation. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are uncommon but may include mild stomach upset. Use antioxidants cautiously in pregnant pets. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Anxiety wraps are vest-like garments designed to calm anxious dogs. The vests work under the theory that pressure applied to the dog's torso causes a calming effect similar to swaddling a crying infant or hugging a distressed person.

  • Aortic stenosis is a heart disease that is present at birth. Dogs affected with aortic stenosis have a narrowing at the aortic valve of the heart. This narrowing forces the heart to work abnormally hard to force blood through the narrowed valve. The clinical signs of aortic stenosis vary depending on how severe the stenosis is; some dogs remain asymptomatic throughout their life, while other dogs begin showing clinical signs at an early age and can experience sudden death. The treatment of aortic stenosis depends upon the severity of the condition.

  • An aortic thromboembolism results when a blood clot is dislodged and travels through the aorta, becoming lodged in a distant location. This causes severely reduced blood flow to the tissues receiving blood from that particular part of the aorta, leading to decreased oxygen in the tissues. Aortic thromboembolism is a rare occurrence in dogs and can be associated with can be associated with endocarditis, cancer, sepsis, hyperadrenocorticism, and with increased protein-loss through diseased kidneys. Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. Initially, dogs may need to be treated as inpatients. Drugs to prevent platelets from clumping together will be prescribed. The expected course of this disorder is days to weeks for full recovery of function to the legs, but the prognosis in general is very poor.

  • Applying Ointments, Creams, and Lotions on Dogs

    Una vez adquiridas las cremas, lociones o aceites surge el problema de cómo administrarlos. Incluso el perro más obediente puede reaccionar de forma violenta a la aplicación en una zona sensible. Esperamos que las siguientes recomendaciones sean de ayuda.

  • Applying Ear Drops to Dogs

    Le hemos recetado este medicamento para ayudar a su mascota a resolver su problema de oídos. Es una enfermedad bastante habitual que puede deberse a muchos motivos. Aunque ya le habremos informado sobre la frecuencia de administración, hemos pensado que sería útil exponer paso a paso cómo aplicar las gotas.

  • Topical ear medications are often necessary to adequately treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions. Instilling ear medications into your dog's ears can be a challenging or potentially difficult task, especially if they are uncomfortable. Have patience and contact your veterinarian if you are having difficulties.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.